Monthly Archives: January 2012

When all the work is done …

As some of you might know, we’ve had quite the deadline today. Actually, yesterday. Well. At midnight. Anyway, it’s over now. And we’re pretty pleased about that.

Well done, everybody.
Here’s a little something to commemorate the occasion:

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Migration News Digest

Holiday – Catch-up

Quite a lot to catch up on:

Australian PM flees Aboriginal protest
To kick things off, a small post from the FP blog, about a rather heated appearance by Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard. Check out the link to the original article in the Sydney Morning Herald as well.

About 50 police, including members of the riot squad brandishing batons and carrying plastic shields, had clashed with angry protesters who were chanting ”shame”, ”racist” and ”always was, will be, Aboriginal land” and banging on the glass walls of the restaurant.

Two Sudans’ oil dispute deepens as South shuts down wells
From the Guardian,  an article on the rising tensions between the two countries over oil.

The landlocked South on Sunday started to halt oil production after accusing Sudan of stealing $815m worth of its oil. South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July 2011 to form the world’s newest country but the neighbours did not agree on oil transit fees.

You can read more on current developments at the BBC News website.

Gulag for gaijin
The Economist reports on Japan’s immigration control, recounting the ordeal of Canadian journalist Christopher Johnson who was called aside for examination upon returning to Tokyo on December 23, 2011:

For about four hours, I sat in limbo, unable to properly communicate with the outside world. Starving and tired, I couldn’t think clearly. Various people in various uniforms aggressively shoved various documents in my face for me to sign. I simply said “wait” to everything and zoned out into a world of denial that this nightmare wasn’t happening.

Romney, Gingrich clash over immigration in Florida debate
From the Washington Times, a report on the Republican primary debate in Florida last week, in which immigration emerged as a new ‘hot topic’:

Fresh out of the gate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney demanded Mr. Gingrich apologize for running a television ad here that described him as “anti-immigrant.” He also assailed him for suggesting that his claims about “self-deportation” and stronger immigration enforcement means that he doesn’t care about “grandmothers.”

If you’re interested in the topic, you can have a look at the coverage at the Huffington Post, or the New Yorker.
Only slightly related,  GOP hopefuls on hot seat for knowing other languages:

In South Carolina, meantime, a pair of Newt Gingrich attack ads against Romney focus on his ability to — mon Dieu! — speak French.

Two takes from Oxford

Firstly, from the COMPAS Blog, comes “A snapshot of urban dynamics”, a report on a research project on urban change in south-east London:

In a sense ‘real’, close-knit Bermondsey started unravelling in 1965 when the metropolitan borough of Bermondsey became part of the London Borough of Southwark. As a result, outsiders gained access to housing in Bermondsey, and over time it became increasingly difficult for Bermondsey-born residents to find housing in the neighbourhood. And to this day, access to affordable local housing remains a cause of local concern and frustration.

Second, from the Migration Observatory, a critical look at three, seemingly contradictory reports on migrant workers: Migrant workers: Taking our jobs or not?

While this creates a headache for news headline writers, and lots of space for politically motivated misuse of research results, the latest contributions to the research on the labour market effects of immigration in the UK strongly suggest that there can be no “absolute” answers to this question. Anybody who argues that it is “obvious” or “clear” that immigration does or does not create unemployment in the UK needs to think again.

And lastly, the Guardian’s Jane Martinson asks, Why so few takers of the refugee experience at Davos?

Richard Branson has done it. So has Jimmy Wales. But this year none of the big names attending the gathering of the power elite at Davos have made the 10-minute walk up the hill to pretend to be a refugee.

We’re hoping to get back to a weekly update cycle soon. In the meantime, if you have a suggestion for an article, please drop us a line.

 

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What’s in your suitcase, Roberts Muriisa?

(As professional migrants, we pack a lot of suitcases. But what’s the one item that you always take with you, wherever you go? That’s the question we ask our lecturers in this series.)

Pt.5 Roberts Muriisa

The one thing I travel with is my flask. I love tea so much so that I
travel with a flask even when I am aware that where I am going, there
are boilers at my disposal. And I love music, with my iPod – nano
having been stolen, I now carry my Galaxy Tab, I guess this is a
better substitute I can now enjoy the music videos too.

Dr. Roberts Muriisa is currently Dean of the Faculty of Development Studies at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Uganda.

Previously in “What’s in your suitcase?”
Pt.1 Renu Modi
Pt.2  Lydia Potts
Pt.3  Ahmed Gamal Eldin
Pt.4 Alissa Tolstokorova


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And we’re back …

Survived the journey, settled in, back to work.

More coming soon, just a little trailer for now:

P.S.: Happy Chinese New Year! Go Dragons!

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