Monthly Archives: December 2011

Signing off for 2011.

Whether you celebrate christmas or not, the holidays are upon us.
The students of 2011-13 are recharging their batteries and getting ready to move to Stavanger, Norway, for our second semester.

We wish you a lovely end to 2011 and a good start to 2012.

P.S.: If you wish, you can track a very peculiar seasonal migration with the help of NORAD.

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Migration News Digest

Week of December 19, 2011
N.B. This will be the last digest this year. See you in 2012!

Europeans migrate south as continent drifts deeper into crisis
From the Guardian, a look at how Greeks, Irish and Portuguese leave their homelands to escape the Eurozone’s recent woes.

The Guardian has spoken to dozens of Europeans who have left, or are planning to leave. Their stories highlight surprising new migration routes – from Lisbon to Luanda, Dublin to Perth, Barcelona to Buenos Aires – as well as more traditional migration patterns.

The Early History of Sudan’s Third Civil War
Eric Reeves, in Dissent Magazine, on the implementation of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA).

In the border regions of Sudan, we are witnessing a ghastly reprise of the conduct that has defined Khartoum’s brutal military control of its restless peripheries for decades—and a reprise of the shameless, mostly unchallenged mendacity with which this regime speaks to the international community.

Postcolonialism and Science Fiction: An Introduction
Jessica Langer, in io9, publishes an excerpt from the introduction of her new book “Postcolonialism and Science Fiction”.

Other times, perhaps more often, there are institutional barriers to the publication of science fiction by postcolonial writers and/or writers of colour. Sherryl Vint (2004) has questioned the relative lack of Black writers in science fiction, blaming this lack partially on a perceived lack of readership.

Thousands of Ethiopian Migrants Stranded in Northern Yemen
Lisa Schlein, in Voice of America, reports on the IOM’s concern for Ethiopian Migrants in Yemen. You can read the corresponding IOM press release here.

Every year, tens of thousands of desperate Ethiopians make the perilous journey across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen. They head toward Saudi Arabia in hopes of finding jobs in the Middle East.

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What’s in your suitcase, Alissa Tolstokorova?

(As professional migrants, we pack a lot of suitcases. But what’s the one item that you always take with you, wherever you go? That’s the question we ask our lecturers in this series.)

Pt.4 Alissa Tolstokorova

I am a frequent traveler and always have my “Miles and More” membership card at Star Alliance with me in my journeys.

Dr. Alissa Tolstokorova is currently Head of Research Experts Group, International School for Equal Opportunities, Kyiv/Ukraine.
She stayed at the University of Oldenburg in the first half of November 2011. 

Previously in “What’s in your suitcase?”

Pt.1 Renu Modi
Pt.2  Lydia Potts
Pt.3 Ahmed Gamal Eldin

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What’s in your suitcase, Ahmed Gamal Eldin?

(As professional migrants, we pack a lot of suitcases. But what’s the one item that you always take with you, wherever you go? That’s the question we ask our lecturers in this series.)

Pt.3 Ahmed Gamal Eldin

An electric beard shaver.

The item I chose is a beard shaver. I have a beard skin sensitive to most types of shavers and blades, I took me a while to find one that my skin is happy with, so I take it with me wherever I travel.

Dr. Ahmed Gamal Eldin is Assistant Professor and Postgraduate Coordinate at the Regional Institute of Gender, Diversity, Peace and Rights of Ahfad University for Women, Sudan.

Previously in “What’s in your suitcase?”
Pt.1 Renu Modi
Pt.2  Lydia Potts

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Migration News Digest

Week of December 12, 2011

Netanyahu to visit Africa in bid to stem illegal migration to Israel
A short article in Haaretz on the Israeli PM’s announcement  early this week that he would visit Africa in early 2012 to tackle the issue of illegal immigration into Israel.

“We hear the outcry coming from Israel’s cities,” Netanyahu said. “We will continue to care for refugees, but they make up a minimal part of the human wave flooding. Entire populations are starting to move and, if we don’t act to stop this, we will be flooded.”

You can also read Netanyahu’s five point plan to deal with ‘Illegal Work Infiltrators’ on the Prime Minister’s website. The plan includes expanding the Saharonim detention facility in the Negev desert, on which Haaretz published a special report some weeks ago. Also, Newsday.com reports on the debate whether the African migrants are bona fide refugees or ‘work infiltrators’:

“Across the world, 88 percent of Eritrean migrants who seek asylum are recognized as refugees,” said Reut Michaeli, an attorney for The Hotline for Migrant Workers. “I find it very difficult to believe that the ones who come to Israel are any different.”

Durban Must Pay Greater Consideration to the Consequences of Climate Change on Migration
In a press release issued last friday, IOM Director General William Lacy Swing urges negotiators at Durban ‘pay greater attention to the consequences of climate change on human mobility’.

“The most serious consequence of climate change and environmental deterioration will most likely be in terms of population displacement,” says Swing.

Related to this: A recent UNEP report titled ‘Livelihood Security: Climate Change, Migration and Conflict in the Sahel’ seeks to chart the impact changes in the climate are already having on people in West Africa. Read more at UN News Centre or download the report from the UNEP.

Dubbed “ground zero” for climate change due to its extreme climatic conditions and highly vulnerable population, the Sahel has faced massive popula- tion growth, pervasive poverty, food insecurity, and chronic instability for decades. With a majority of the population directly dependent on natural resources for its livelihood, the predicted impacts of climate change for resource availability and food security in the region could be dramatic.

Tech Migration: How Refugees Use Mobile Phones to Locate and Communicate With Family
MobileActive.org reports on refugee’s use of technology, summarising two article from the Forced Migration Review.

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Migration News Digest

Week of December 5, 2011

IOM World Migration Report 2011
The latest of the IOM’s reports on global migration was released yesterday on December 5th.
You can download the report here, watch the webcast with government ministers and other senior officials, prominent keynote speakers, notable migrants, distinguished personalities in the field of migration, and former Director General and Deputy Directors General of IOM here or read about the report in the New York Times.
Also, in case you were wondering, the Holy See just joined the IOM.

Keeping Up With Schengen
Frontex Director Ilkka Laitinen, at publicservice.co.uk on the challenges facing European border control.

To safeguard the right of Europe’s citizens to travel and trade freely without internal borders requires increased surveillance and control at the external borders. Moreover, it requires commitment and solidarity among the EU’s member states and Schengen-Associated Countries (SACs) to ensure a sharing of the common burden for the common interest. In short, Schengen’s borders are only as strong as their weakest link.

Thinking Behind The Numbers: Understanding Public Opinion on Immigration in Britain
The Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford published this report a couple of weeks trying to answer the questions: What do people have in mind when they think of ‘immigrants’ and what are their views about the number of ‘immigrants’ to the UK.

Our poll supported previous findings that a large majority of people in Britain favour cuts in immigration. 69% of respondents to the survey we commissioned said they want immigration reduced. But it also found that the public’s views on immigration are complex and nuanced in a way that previous polls have failed to capture, and that these views vary substantially depending on which immigrant groups the public is considering.

The Gray Area of Gay Refugees
Jonathan Kalan, in Global Post, chronicles a Ugandan couples flight from Kampala to a Kenyan refugee camp and their life there.

These two men are not rebel soldiers. They are not fleeing war or drought, and they aren’t really brothers. They are lovers, and they came here to escape what they feared would be certain death after being outed last year in a country where homosexuality is widely considered a mortal sin, as “unnatural” as it is “un-African.”

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EMMIR International Evening

On Friday, 2 December, the EMMIR students and team met for a little culinary celebration. Here’s a one minute summary.

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